Posts Tagged ‘Fishing Travel’

Fishing in Cuba Now Legal!

April 30, 2015

US Citizens can now legally sport fish in Cuba

2015 will be remembered in Angling history as the year it became legal for US Citizens, in possession of a “people to people” travel letter from the non-profit fisheries research and conservation organization Bonefish Tarpon Trust (BTT), to sport fish in Cuba.

2015 is also the year travel restrictions were lifted, making it legal for US airlines to fly to Cuba, US travel agents to book travelers to Cuba and US insurance companies to offer travel insurance to US Citizens traveling to Cuba.

Angler Adventures has been assisting a limited number of US anglers traveling legally to Cuba for several years. But, the easing of restrictions in general and the travel license from BTT in particular, opens the door for any US angler wanting to fish Cuba.

What hasn’t changed (and will take years to catch up) is the tourist infrastructure within Cuba and the transportation network to Cuba. Traveling to Cuba is still complex. We recommend using a knowledgeable, qualified travel agent, whether it’s your first trip or your twelfth.

In addition to having a staff of fishing experts, Angler Adventures is a full service travel agency, licensed to sell travel insurance. Angler Adventures can assist you in selecting a fishing location in Cuba, prepare you for what to fish for and what to bring, assist you in obtaining the travel letter from the BTT, assist with your Cuban Visa, create the most efficient travel itinerary for you and your group and offer you the protection of travel insurance for trip cancellation, trip interruption, emergency medical evacuation, and more.

Call us today at 1-800-628-1447. There is so much more we’d like to share with you about this fascinating country and phenomenal saltwater fishery.

Want to know more about traveling to Cuba and its amazing Fisheries:  Click or Tap below.

Cuba: Now AvailableBonefish, Permit, Tarpon, Snook & More

Jardines de la Reina: Bonefish, Permit and Tarpon! Grand Slam!

Cayo Largo: Over 500 Fly Caught Permit!

Cayo Cruz: Big Bones and Tailing Permit

Isla de la JuventudBig Tarpon and Snook

Advertisements

Tanzania Tigerfishing

August 2, 2012

Tanzania offers one of the finest fisheries left on the planet – Tigerfishing on the Mnyera and Ruhudji Rivers.  This is the place if you’re looking to catch a big Tigerfish on the fly.  The season runs from August to November (15 weeks) each year, with a maximum of 8 rods per week (4 rods per river). 

The early part of the season is good for big fish with less numbers and late season in better for more fish with a decrease in average size. Early season the water levels are higher and guests can expect to hook around 10 fish per day.  During the later part of the season, water levels are lower and warmer, and this attract more small male fish into the system from floodplains downstream, accounting for the increase in smaller fish in the system.  During this time, clients will expect to hook up to 20 or so fish per day.

The strikes are violent and when a Tigerfish hits your fly, she’s moving at top speed.  Due to the voracity, strength, and size of these fish, a 50% hook up to landed fish ratio is considered doing well.  Tigersfish will actually hold the fly in their jaws for an entire fight, unhooked, only to open their mouth at the boat and spit the fly.  Similar to Tarpon fishing, it’s all about the take, the acrobatic jumps, and the fight. 

The past 2 seasons on the Mnyera and Ruhudji were superb: 578 fish landed between 10 and 20 lbs and 31 fish breaking the magical 20lb mark.  To put this in perspective, a trophy Tigerfish from any other river would be 12 pounds.  On the Mnyera and Ruhudji, the average fish is between 8 – 12 lbs. 

The cost for 7-nights / 6-days fishing is USD $6,750 per person person based on double occupancy accommodations and a shared boat / guide daily.

 

20 lb Tigerfish? I’d be smiling too!

St Brandon’s Atoll Bonefishing

July 19, 2012

FlyCastaway has arrived in Connecticut and we’ve been enjoying spending some quality time with Gerhard and hearing him speak about the fishing programs.  You may not have heard, but St Brandon’s has been described as the finest bonefishing in the world.  We know it’s a tall order to fill, since there are excellent fisheries like North Riding Point, that produce quality numbers of double digit bonefish each year.  An excerpt from a FlyCastaway’s description of the May 11 – 20, 2012 trip to St. Brandon’s.  

The week started off with an absolute bang, the neap tides meant we had ample time to fish some of our Bonefish hotspots and we literally climbed into the monsters St Brandon’s has become renowned for. Simply put, the fishing was off the charts! Each day at least one team would return home with an image of a weighed double digit Bonefish. For those not in the know, most dedicated saltwater anglers will go his entire lifetime without ever holding a 10lb fish….and we were doing it on a daily basis. By the end of the week we racked up no less than ten fish, which weighed over the 10lb mark, two of which were eleven pounds!

The average size was equally impressive, and when guys started putting their noses up at eight pounders we had to give them a little pep talk. Something along the lines of “each fish is special” and “you don’t know when you’ll get this opportunity again”. Added to this we had some scary good sight fishing for these hogs as they tailed in water no deeper than our gravel guards …

The “schooling” bonefish are in the 6 – 7 pound class, one or two 4-pound bonefish may be the smallest bonefish you’ll see, and there are bones there pushing 14-pounds.  Oh, the fishing is 100% wading and there are only 8 anglers fishing these flats every other week over two 3-month seasons each year. If you love bonefishing, this might just be having your cake and eating it too!

Nice Bonefish from St. Brandon's Atoll

The “Bully Special” Fly

August 9, 2011

Here’s another excerpt from Dick Brown’s revised Bonefish Fly Patterns, which was re-released this summer.  At Angler Adventures, we’re really big fans of bonefish guides that can consistently find big fish.  The fly below was created by an excellent big bonefish guide at North Riding Point Club on Grand Bahama.

The Bully Special

It's not pretty, but it is effective

Bully Special Fly Photo: © 2011 Dick Brown

A Bully Bevans design. Sample in photo was tied by Bully on a size 4 34007 hook and measures horizontally 2″ in length from hook eye to end of tail; bottom tip of wing is about 1 3/8″ below hook shank. A second sample from Bully measured 2 1/2″ by 1 3/8″ on a larger hook. Fly rides hook-point up.

Hook: 34007; sizes 4, 6

Thread: Fluorescent (Gotcha) pink or orange (actually burnt orange in hue) Danville Flat Waxed Nylon 3/0

Eyes: 5/32″ Spirit River nickel-plated I-Balz weighted barbell with green iris

Tail: Heavy (about thirty to forty strands) copper Krystal Flash

Body: Wound pearl Diamond Braid

Wing: Heavy (about thirty to forty strands) copper Krystal Flash

Prey notes: Suggestive of dark and medium brown mantis shrimps found in the Bahamas.

Anecdotes: New England fly fisher Ledge Mitchell was one of the first to use the fly, and he later scored a trophy fish with it. “Bruce Bauman and I were fishing with Bully at North Riding Point three years ago,” says Ledge. “We were doing OK but had had a couple of refusals, so I asked Bully if there was anything else we should try. He reached in his pocket and pulled out an all–gold-copper pattern, saying, ‘Try this.’ We had good luck fishing that fly— five bones, as I remember—and when I asked what it was called, Bully replied, ‘I don’t know.’ So I said to Bully, ‘I’m going to name it after you.’” A year later Ledge returned to NRP and took a 14-pound bone while fishing with fellow angler Carl Soderland and guide Deon Leathen. The fly? You guessed it—the Bully Special, which Ledge had tied on a big #2 hook. Author’s note: This fly, or one very similar to it, appears in the 2008 new and revised edition of Fly Fishing for Bonefish as the Deepwater Cay Club Fly. I have Ledge Mitchell (see his anecdote above) to thank for tipping me off that the pattern was, in fact, the Bully Special from the North Riding Point Club.

Bully Bevans is a superb bonefish guide. He is the North Riding Point Club’s “big fish specialist” and one of the guides most often requested by guests there. His fly has been extremely successful on Grand Bahama’s productive north shore.

Tying notes: Bully says he came up with this very effective big bone fly because he was out of flies and needed something to fish with for a client the next day. Good tying materials are notoriously rare in the Bahamas, so in a moment of pure serendipity, he tied his creation out of what he had on hand. It worked from the first day and is now his favorite fly. He ties it in sizes 4 and 6 only—he does not like it any bigger. He likes lead eyes for normal 11⁄2- to 2-foot depths and bead chain for shallower water, but none for tailing. Author’s note: I received three samples of this fly tied by Bully: two from Bully and a chewed-up sample from Ledge Mitchell (which may be one of the first Bully ever tied). One had I-Balz eyes and pink thread, one had unpainted lead eyes and brown thread, and one had nickel-plated eyes and fire orange thread . . . and all looked very fishy!

Reprinted from Bonefish Fly Patterns, 2nd Edition by Dick Brown, ©2011. Published by Lyons Press an imprint of Globe Pequot Press, Guilford, CT

Traveling with Fishing Tackle

May 19, 2011

As a travel agency specializing in international fishing travel, we’re regularly asked how to travel with fishing tackle.  We recommend 100% of the time that traveling anglers pack expensive reels and flies in their carry on luggage to avoid them being delayed, lost or stolen while in route to your fishing destination.  Also, despite not fitting into the airline usual “carry on requirements”, most airlines are allowing small cases of 3, 4 or 5 piece fly rods as carry-ons, as long as they fit in the overhead compartment (please check with your individual airline for their specific policies).  Metal objects (such as pliers, scissors, snips, pocket knives, screwdrivers, etc) that could be considered dangerous, should be packed in your checked luggage to avoid delays and possible confiscation at security checkpoints. 

The Travel Security Administration (TSA), the governmental body providing the manpower and regulations at our airports security checkpoints allow specialty fishing gear (like reels and flies) to be packed in check luggage.  We recommend that anyone traveling with fishing tackle visit the TSA website and carry a printed copy of the document entitled: “Traveling with Special Items – Hunting and Fishing” with their carry luggage / E-Tickets.

Also, we recommend investigating a fishing equipment specific carry on bag, like the Fishpond Dakota Carry On Rod & Reel Case

The Vulcan Grilse Grip

May 11, 2011

For those of you planning an Atlantic salmon trip this summer, here’s a tip from Doug Schlink you might enjoy. 

Adult, mutli-sea-winter (MSW) Atlantic salmon fish can be captured by hand tailing.  This is accomplished by wrapping your hand and around the “wrist” of their tail (known as the caudal peduncle), just in front of the tail fin, much as you would grasp your own left wrist with your right hand just in front of your hand.   The tail fin on an MSW fish has developed stiff exterior rays, and prevents the fish from slipping through.  

Atlantic salmon that have only spent one winter at sea before returning to the river to spawn are known as grilse.  Grilse are smaller, usually from 20 – 24 inches in length, and have not yet developed this stiffness in the tail fin’s exterior rays.  A sure way to tell a big grilse from a small salmon is to check the development of the tail fin exterior rays.  If they are stiff, and don’t collapse when you try to squeeze them together, it’s a salmon.  But if they collapse, it’s a grilse. 

Doug Schlink with nice looking MSW Atlantic

Not a Grilse

Because of this lack of development in the exterior caudal fin rays of a grilse, if you try to “tail” a grilse with this conventional method, the tail fin collapses and he’ll squirt right out of your grasp!

But if your guide is not handy with the net when you’re about to land your grilse, you still can hand tail him using the technique I call the “Vulcan Grilse Grip”.    Make a “V” or a “peace sign” by extending your index and middle finger of your dominant hand.  With thumb extended, slide this “V” so one finger is on the top and the other along the bottom of the caudal peduncle.  Now quickly wrap the thumb around and close the rest of your hand as if you’re trying to make a fist.  You should now have a firm grasp on the fish!  I’m not sure why this works, but it does. 

A word of caution, never lift a salmon or a grilse you plan to release clear out of the water by the tail.  This can cause internal damage.  Please use hand tailing only as a means of securing the salmon in the water so you can remove the fly and properly release into the current.  If you want to lift a salmon for a photo, use your other hand to gently support the body of the fish, and lift no more than a few inches from the water and for no more than a few seconds. 

Many thanks to angling great Larry Solomon, co-author of the classic “The Caddis and the Angler”, for showing me this technique over 20 years ago on the Nepisiguit River. 

Estancia del Zorro Chile Fishing Report

December 16, 2009

Estancia del Zorro Fishing Report

Great Trout Fishing in Chile

 

Hi Chip

Hope that you are all doing great there in Connecticut.   A small report on what is going on at the Estancia, to wet your appetite.

Last week the fishing at the ranch was outstanding to say the least. Our guests caught very nice trout on the Pedregoso Creek, the Coyhaique River and of Course on the Zorro Spring Creek.

The Pedregoso was particularly productive there we have been averaging 50 trout per guest a day (between 12 and 19 inches).

At the Zorro Creek they caught an overage of 15 trout per day, they were from 16 to 24 inches. (all in dry flies, since they did not want to use nymphs).

We are starting to see some pretty good hatches in the afternoon (may flies and caddis); we expect that the fishing in the next weeks will keep getting better and better.

Now we have a group from New York and Pennsylvania, they are here for the second time and were having a blast in the Pedregoso today.

For more information, call (800-628-1447 / 860-434-9624) or email Chip Bates (chip@angleradventures.com) at Angler Adventures. 

Big Browns from the Estancia del Zorro Spring Creek

2 for the Price of 1

November 3, 2009

2-for-1-deals-from-Angler-Adventures

Angler Adventures has negotiated several value packed “2 for the price of 1” deals at some of our premier lodges. For more information, please click on the lodge name, or call us at 800-628-1447 (860-434-9624). 

   

Paloma-River-Lodge  

  • Spectacular, remote setting.
  • 6 person capacity.
  • Rainbows and big Browns.
  • Normal weekly price $3,250 per person, double occupancy / shared guide.
  • Angler Adventures’ Special for November 2009: $1,625 per person double occupancy / shared guide. 

    

Lodge-Name-Test  

  • Excellent Bonefishing with good chances at Permit.
  • Access to Gorda Cay and Mores Island.
  • Price Reduction for 2010.
  • Normal weekly price $2,820 per person double occupancy / shared guide.
  • Angler Adventures’ Special through February 2010: $1,813 per person double occupancy / shared guide.

    

Turneffe-Island-Resort  

  • Permit, Bonefish, and Tarpon.
  • 30-miles off the coast of Belize.
  • Only 6 spots currently available: 2 – November 7 – 14, 2009 & 4 – November 21 – 28, 2009.
  • Normal weekly price $3,902.58 per person, double occupancy / shared guide.
  • Angler Adventures’ Special: $2,573.09 per person double occupancy / shared guide. 

    

Abaco-Lodge  

  • Direct access to Bonefishing in the Marls.
  • Nice Accommodations and Gourmet Meals.
  • Great location for non-anglers.
  • Normal weekly price $6,800 per couple double occupancy / shared guide.
  • Angler Adventures’ Special, February 1st – March 15th, 2010: $4,250 per couple double occupancy / shared guide.

    

Acklins-Island-Lodge  

  • Extensive Hard Sand Flats.
  • Wade fisherman’s paradise.
  • Comfortable cottage style accommodations.
  • Normal weekly price $3,085 per person double occupancy / shared guide.
  • Angler Adventures’ Special for bookings confirmed before January 1, 2010: $1,962.50 per person double occupancy / shared guide. 

    

Nomads-of-the-Seas  

  • Experience Chilean Patagonia in luxury.
  • Unparalleled level of Service.
  • Access to typically inaccessible fertile fishing grounds.
  • Normal weekly price $17,850 per person double occupancy / shared guide.
  • Angler Adventures’ Special: $8,925 per person double occupancy / shared guide.

These discounts are offered to new reservations only and do not apply to existing reservations, nor date changes to existing reservations.  Discounts for alternate times, or other lodges may be available. If the above offerings aren’t exactly what you’re looking for call us at 1-800-628-1447; and we’ll find you the best possible deal! 

800-628-1447 / 860-434-9624
Fax: 860-434-8605
Email:
info@angleradventures.com
PO Box 872, Old Lyme, CT 06371
Website:
www.angleradventures.com 

Arroyo Claro Presentation

September 17, 2009

Jorge Graziosi was the guest speaker at a luncheon held September 9th, 2009 at the Anglers’ Club of New York, 101 Broad Street. Other invited guests included three representatives of Angler Adventures; owner Chip Bates, Travel Manager Judy Hall, and Webmaster Evan Peterson.

Jorge Graziosi has been guiding in Patagonia, Argentina since 1968. In 1999 he built and opened Arroyo Claro Lodge, located in the beautiful Carrileufu River Valley, a 3-hour drive south of Bariloche and 3-hours from the Chilean border. Jorge may be the only outfitter offering guests the opportunity to fish both Argentina and Chile. Arroyo Claro Lodge will host an Anglers’ Club outing January 23-30, 2010. Arrangements for the Anglers’ Club Argentina trip are being handled by Angler Adventures. Click here for more information on Arroyo Claro Lodge or contact Chip Bates at Angler Adventures: (800) 628-1447 or Chip@angleradventures.com.

We hope you enjoy Jorge Graziosi’s slide show presentation to the Anglers’ Club, below.  If you would like the slide show to auto-play, please click on the menu in the lower left hand corner and select auto-play.  Click here to read Angler Adventures September 2009  Newsletter.


%d bloggers like this: